Modern retelling of pride and prejudice book

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modern retelling of pride and prejudice book

Eligible: A modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice (Paperback) | Island Books

Email address:. More News. Eligible: A modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice. What The Reviewers Say. But Sittenfeld is the ideal modern-day reinterpreter. Her special skill lies not just in her clear, clean writing, but in her general amusement about the world, her arch, pithy, dropped-mike observations about behavior, character and motivation. As a long game of literary Mad Libs, Eligible is undeniably delightful.
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Review: Emma A Modern Retelling

What are the best modern Pride and Prejudice books?

So much so that it has been rewritten, riffed on, and reimagined hundreds of times. If you are not familiar with the story, the five Bennett daughters, with much prompting one might say, hectoring from their mother, are looking for husbands to improve the diminished family fortunes. The story primarily deals with Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy, a standoffish type, who misunderstand each other but are united in the end. This blog post deals with retellings of this acclaimed novel set in the present day.

Sittenfeld has accomplished that and more with her fantastic new novel. The Bennet sisters have been transported to modern day Cincinnati. Jane is a yoga instructor; Liz, a writer for a women's magazine; Lydia and Kitty do nothing but work out; and Mary spends most of her time in her room. The two older sisters live in New York, but have come home to check on Mr. Bennet, who is recovering from a heart attack. The storyline is one that will be familiar to most Austen readers, but with some extremely funny twists.

Buy Eligible: A Modern Retelling of Pride and Prejudice by Curtis Sittenfeld (ISBN : ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free.
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October 11, 2019

Of these good-mannered, good-natured women, Emma Woodhouse is the most self-confident, even to the point of self-congratulation, and thereby runs a risk, for her author sees presumptuousness as a fault to which even diffidence is preferable. Miss Bates says:. - Good news millennials! You're getting your very own "modern retelling" of Pride and Prejudice ; because how else can your generation comprehend the experiences of Jane Austen's Elizabeth Bennet unless she's a trendy magazine editor?

Classics are called such for a reason, but what happens when someone decides to take one and retell it in a new way? Pretty amazing things, or at least that's what happens in this collection of the best Pride and Prejudice book adaptations. Even if you're a die-hard fan of the original novel, you'll delight in these creative reimaginings, I promise. Out of all of Jane Austen's novels, Pride and Prejudice is the most beloved and widely read. With the help of a fierce, bookish heroine, a timeless romance, and witty social critique, the romantic classic is compulsively re readable. Filled with vivid imagery, vibrant characters, and beautiful language, it's the kind of story you can get completely lost in over and over and over again.

Sittenfeld has accomplished that and more with her fantastic new novel. The Bennet sisters have been transported to modern day Cincinnati. Jane is a yoga instructor; Liz, a writer for a women's magazine; Lydia and Kitty do nothing but work out; and Mary spends most of her time in her room. The two older sisters live in New York, but have come home to check on Mr. Bennet, who is recovering from a heart attack. The storyline is one that will be familiar to most Austen readers, but with some extremely funny twists.

From the desk of Kimberly Denny-Ryder:. Contemporary Pride and Prejudice re-tellings are my second favorite types of Jane Austen fan fiction. What-ifs own my heart! I love seeing how authors attempt to believably transport Elizabeth, Darcy, and their story into a modern setting. Seeing the juxtaposition of such a timeless story with modern technology and social cues is always an interesting and fun experiment.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Denna G. says:

    You are here

  2. Charles S. says:

    Was Jane Austen a feminist? The answer is in her stories | Curtis Sittenfeld

  3. Neville B. says:

    Like many, many other women and a few discriminating men I love the novel Pride and Prejudice.

  4. Thérèse N. says:

    Thanks for voting!

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